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Africa

Celebrating Africa's Female Athletes and Leaders of Tomorrow

Makhtar Diop's picture
 

What will the world look like in 2050?

What we know is that nearly 70% of the world’s population will live in cities.
 
What we want, as envisioned through Sustainable Development Goal 11 (SDG11), is that future cities are inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable for all – including over one billion persons with disabilities.
 
In keeping with SDG11, the New Urban Agenda is striving to ensure that future cities, towns and basic urban infrastructures and services are more environmentally accessible, user-friendly, and inclusive of all people’s needs, including persons with disabilities.
 
[Immersive story: 3 Big Ideas to Achieve Sustainable Cities and Communities]
 
Cities need to be designed in a way that facilitates access for persons with disabilities to buildings and services, and increases their opportunities for economic participation and activity.


The need for disability-inclusive urban development cities was emphasized at the Ninth World Urban Forum (WUF9), held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in February 2018. Throughout the seven-day conference, participants from around the world highlighted, among other themes, the importance of the inclusion of persons with disabilities in urban development.
 
In this video, Charlotte McClain-Nhlapo (@McNhlapo), the World Bank’s Global Advisor for Disability Inclusion, interviews World Bank Director for Urban and Territorial Development and Disaster Risk Management, Sameh Wahba (@SamehNWahba) on his reflections on the outcomes of WUF9.
 
In the interview, Sameh emphasizes the importance of “ensuring access for all, not just in the sense of access to transport and infrastructure, but also in the sense of creating opportunities for all, in particular for persons with disabilities.” 

No, 70% of the world’s poor aren’t women, but that doesn’t mean poverty isn’t sexist

Carolina Sanchez's picture
“Seventy percent of the world’s extreme poor are women”. If you’ve encountered this statistic before, please raise your hand. That is a lot of hands. And yet, this is what we call a ‘zombie statistic’: often quoted but rarely, if ever, presented with a source from which the number can be replicated.

How many companies are run by women, and why does it matter?

Masako Hiraga's picture

Burned car in the center of city after unrest - aragami12345s l Shutterstock.com
Qu’ont en commun les personnes justifiant les attaques qui ciblent les populations civiles ? Nous nous penchons sur cette question dans une nouvelle étude (a) consacrée à l’extrémisme violent du point de vue de ceux qui le cautionnent. Notre travail ne s’attache pas au processus de radicalisation ni aux caractéristiques des auteurs d’attaques terroristes, mais à celles des répondants à des enquêtes d’opinion qui affirment que les attaques terroristes sur les civils sont justifiées. Ces personnes, à l’opinion si radicale, ne perpétreront peut-être pas elles-mêmes des actes terroristes, mais elles présentent un risque élevé d’être recrutées par des organisations terroristes, de sympathiser avec ces groupes ou d’être disposées à les aider.Qu’ont en commun les personnes justifiant les attaques qui ciblent les populations civiles ? Nous nous penchons sur cette question dans une nouvelle étude (a) consacrée à l’extrémisme violent du point de vue de ceux qui le cautionnent. Notre travail ne s’attache pas au processus de radicalisation ni aux caractéristiques des auteurs d’attaques terroristes, mais à celles des répondants à des enquêtes d’opinion qui affirment que les attaques terroristes sur les civils sont justifiées. Ces personnes, à l’opinion si radicale, ne perpétreront peut-être pas elles-mêmes des actes terroristes, mais elles présentent un risque élevé d’être recrutées par des organisations terroristes, de sympathiser avec ces groupes ou d’être disposées à les aider.

Why we must engage women and children in disaster risk management

Monica Vidili's picture

It is a fact that many of the countries which suffer the most from corruption are the countries which have the fewest resources to combat the problem.  Poor countries may be faced with a dilemma of using resources to prosecute the corruption which degrades the quality and quantity of public goods that reach their citizens, or using resources to provide those basic goods, such as food aid and roads.

At the same time, larger bribes are not infrequently paid by outsiders, such as foreign corporations.  Casual observation shows that funds must be coming from outside some of the poorest countries.  In short, the bribe money is flowing from the developed world into the developing world.  

Digital Economy in Senegal: Envisioning the Future

Aneliya Muller's picture

Differentiating between effective and nominal access

A couple of months ago, one of our urban development colleagues wrote about the gap between effective and nominal access to water infrastructure services. She explained that while many of the households in the study area were equipped with the infrastructure to supply clean water, a large number of them do not use it because of its price. She highlighted a “simple fact: it is not sufficient to have a service in your house, your yard, or your street. The service needs to work and you should be able to use it. If you can’t afford it or if features—such as design, location, or quality—prevent its use, you are not benefiting from that service.” To address this concern, the water practice has been developing ways to differentiate between “effective access” and “nominal access”—between having access to an infrastructure or service and being able to use it.

In transport, too, we have been exploring similar issues. In a series of blog posts on accessibility, we have looked at the way accessibility tools—the ability to quantify the opportunities that are accessible using a transit system—are reframing how we understand, evaluate, and plan transport systems. We have used this method that allows us to assess the effectiveness of public transport in connecting people to employment opportunities within a 60-minute commute.

Incorporating considerations of cost

Yet, time is not the only constraint that people face when using public transport systems. In Bogota, for example, the average percentage of monthly income that an individual spends on transport exceeds 20% for those in the lowest income group. In some parts of the city, this reaches up to 28%—well above the internationally acceptable level of affordability of 15%.

Facing Forward: Schooling for Learning in Africa

Elizabeth Ninan Dulvy's picture
The facts relating to learning outcomes in many countries in the Africa region are depressing and the challenges are immense. But there is a growing body of new evidence from countries across Africa that points to lessons that can be learned about what has worked to improve learning. Together with my co-authors, Sajitha Bashir, Marlaine Lockheed, Jee-Peng Tan and many other contributors, the World Bank has just released a book entitled “Facing Forward: Schooling for Learning in Africa” that focuses on how to improve learning outcomes in basic education —i.e six years of primary and three years of lower secondary education. 
 

A light at the end of the tunnel: Implementing ICT for public work programs in Ghana through e-services

Suleiman Namara's picture

It is a fact that many of the countries which suffer the most from corruption are the countries which have the fewest resources to combat the problem.  Poor countries may be faced with a dilemma of using resources to prosecute the corruption which degrades the quality and quantity of public goods that reach their citizens, or using resources to provide those basic goods, such as food aid and roads.

At the same time, larger bribes are not infrequently paid by outsiders, such as foreign corporations.  Casual observation shows that funds must be coming from outside some of the poorest countries.  In short, the bribe money is flowing from the developed world into the developing world.  

Landslides, dumpsites, and waste pickers

Silpa Kaza's picture

América Latina posee una larga, fracturada y en definitiva fracasada historia en torno a los medios públicos. Los llamados “medios públicos” generalmente han operado como instituciones controladas por el gobierno con fines espurios —propaganda y clientelismo— en lugar de presentar contenidos de calidad al servicio de los múltiples intereses públicos.

To close the gap in women’s land rights, we need to do a better job of measuring it

M. Mercedes Stickler's picture
A woman holding her land certificate in rural Zambia. © Jeremy Green
A woman holding her land certificate in rural Zambia. © Jeremy Green

There is broad global agreement that secure property rights help eradicate poverty and that securing women’s land rights reduces gender inequality. But our understanding remains strikingly limited when it comes to the extent to which women’s land rights are – or are not – secure and the impact of women’s tenure security (or lack thereof) on women’s empowerment.

This is true even in Africa, where the most studies have been published, due to shortcomings in both the quality and quantity of research on these questions.

Investing in Africa’s talent

Esteve Sala's picture
Africa will have more people joining the labor force over the next 20 years than the rest of the world combined. Photo credit: World Bank

For every software developer in the United States, there are five open jobs. Africa, meanwhile, has the youngest, fastest-growing population on earth, with more people joining the labor force over the next 20 years than the rest of the world combined.

With this idea in mind, and the powerful belief that "brilliance is evenly distributed, but opportunity is not," Andela, founded four years ago, began recruiting recent graduates in Africa with the mission of connecting them to job opportunities in high-tech companies. Today, about 650 developers in Lagos, Nairobi, and Kampala work full-time for over 100 firms spread across 45 cities worldwide.


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