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public-private partnerships

10 candid career questions with PPP professionals – Brian Samuel

Brian Samuel's picture

Editor's Note: 
Welcome to the “10 Candid Career Questions” series, introducing you to the PPP professionals who do the deals, analyze the data, and strategize on the next big thing. Each of them followed a different path into PPP practice, and this series offers an inside look at their backgrounds, motivations, and choices. Each blogger receives the same 15 questions and answers 10 or more that tell their PPP career story candidly and without jargon. We believe you’ll be as surprised and inspired as we were. 

10 candid career questions with PPP professionals – Fernanda Ruiz Nunez

Fernanda Ruiz Nunez's picture

Editor's Note:
Welcome to the “10 Candid Career Questions” series, introducing you to the PPP professionals who do the deals, analyze the data, and strategize on the next big thing. Each of them followed a different path into PPP practice, and this series offers an inside look at their backgrounds, motivations, and choices.
Each blogger receives the same 15 questions and answers 10 or more that tell their PPP career story candidly and without jargon. We believe you’ll be as surprised and inspired as we were.

10 candid career questions with PPP professionals – Nico Saporiti

Nico Saporiti's picture

Editor's Note:
Here at the PPP Blog, our New Year’s resolution is to bring you global perspectives on PPPs – and one way to do this is by introducing you to the PPP professionals who do the deals, analyze the data, and strategize on the next big thing.
Each of them followed a different path into PPP practice, and our new series - 
10 Candid Career Questions- offers an inside look at their backgrounds, motivations, and choices. Each blogger receives the same 15 questions and answers 10 or more that tell their PPP career story candidly and without jargon.


 

Multilateral development banks collaborate to improve public-private partnerships: broad initiatives

Matthew Jordan-Tank's picture
In my last post, I mentioned that battle-hardened cognoscenti of the PPP industry never imagined, before the launch of the PPP Knowledge Lab, that they would be able to access all of the PPP-related resources they need on one single platform. But there’s something else that these players could not have visualized just a decade ago: the scope of the collaborations that are taking place across the entire PPP marketplace. 

Multilateral development banks collaborate to improve public-private partnerships: the PPP Knowledge Lab

Matthew Jordan-Tank's picture
As I look over the arc of my participation in the infrastructure sector with development banks, which began in the Inter-American Development Bank in Latin America in the late 1990s and has continued for the last eight years with the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) in Eastern Europe and beyond, I realize that there is something quite unprecedented happening now in our sector.

Italy’s first water sector public-private partnership and its implications for today

Nico Saporiti's picture
Villoresi irrigation canal in Italy
Credit: Nico Saporiti

The intake of the Villoresi irrigation canal is a monumental structure of classical beauty: it tames the blue waters of the River Ticino, just below the outlet of Lake Maggiore, and quenches the thirst of 85,000 hectares of otherwise dry land to the north of Milan.

This imposing project was designed, financed, and built entirely with private capital between 1877 and 1890. A 90-year concession was granted by the King of Italy only 15 days after receiving the investment proposal from the original investors. In 1918, farmers formed a consortium of water users and took over the concession and the infrastructure.

With such a head start in the development of water sector public-private partnerships (PPPs), one would imagine that in Italy such contracts would be widespread and well known. In fact, the opposite is true, and the political debate around the meaning of private sector participation in water services is as heated, alive, and confused as ever. A leading national newspaper printed, in the same edition, one article broadly supportive of a popular movement against private involvement in water service providers, and another article denouncing a case of pollution by a (public) water company that had been discharging untreated sewage and hazardous waste in the Bay of Naples.

Kenya’s 3 keys to success: How to create an effective public-private partnership unit

Stanley K. Kamau's picture

Stanley K. Kamau is the Director of Kenya’s PPP Unit and is responsible for overall coordination, promotion, and oversight implementation of the country’s PPP program. Appointed in early 2010, he has been the driving force behind Kenya’s PPP agenda, overseeing the establishment and operationalization of a robust legal and regulatory framework, as well as an ambitious PPP pipeline.

I’m often asked what makes our PPP program here in Kenya so effective. The Kenya PPP program has emerged from the initial stages of building and strengthening the regulatory and institutional framework for PPPs at various levels, and has now moved on to the actual implementation of an ambitious project pipeline of currently 71 proposed projects. We’ve created a unit with some impressive successes, and much of it is because other nations shared their lessons with us along the way.  Now it’s our turn, and we’d like to impart the most important lessons learned to help other PPP units that may be struggling

The top three of the key factors to our PPP Unit’s growth are:

New data on private participation in infrastructure in emerging markets

Clive Harris's picture

Also available in: Español 中文

The latest Global Update on Private Participation in Infrastructure (PPI) for the first half of 2015, available today from the World Bank Group’s Private Participation in Infrastructure Database, shows that total investment commitments for projects with private participation (hereafter investments) in energy, transport, and water sectors fell from US$53.6 billion in the first half of 2014 to US$25.3 billion in the first half of 2015, a decline of over 50 percent. If this trend continues, the annual total investment will be the lowest since 2005. On the bright side, investment poured into many small renewable energy projects, especially solar, accounting for almost half of total investment in infrastructure and almost two-thirds of all projects.

Carolina on my mind: North Carolina’s Innovative Road PPP Financing Mechanism

Cledan Mandri-Perrott's picture
A rendering of the south section of I-77 near
Oaklawn Avenue in Charlotte.
Credit: NCDOT communications

“In my mind, I’m goin’ to Carolina,” sang North Carolina native James Taylor – but he probably wasn’t traveling there on a road funded through a public-private partnership (PPP). That’s because PPPs in the United States are not as prevalent as in other regions of the world. The reasons are varied, but it’s in large part because each state is responsible for setting its own transportation strategy and financing plan. Furthermore, U.S. state and subnational entities have traditionally benefited from an active municipal bond market that has allowed them to access monies from the capital market.

But a recent project in a commuter corridor in North Carolina might change the way people travel around the state.  Based in Charlotte, the largest city, the I-77 is the region’s first transportation PPP. This innovative US$650 million brownfield project combines private sector know-how with an efficient use of public funding structures, and could be a model for other U.S.-based transportation projects. In fact, some of the lessons from this project could also offer a way for other countries to develop public support mechanisms.

Saint Petersburg: 3 lessons in public-private partnership implementation

Jeff Delmon's picture
St. Petersburg, Russia
Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kishjar/

The enchanting city of Saint Petersburg, Russia, boasts the canals of Venice, the cathedrals of Paris, the architecture of Stockholm, and the non-stop festival atmosphere of white nights in July and August. It is Russia’s second largest city, with around 4 million people and a bustling economy.  Saint Petersburg has also learned hard-won lessons in public-private partnership (PPP) creation and implementation, including:

Lesson 1: Start with the basics
Saint Petersburg started with very big, very bold PPP projects, like a €6 billion toll road and a €1 billion tunnel, followed by a €1 billion light rail line and a €1.2 billion airport expansion. The toll road and tunnel came to bid in late 2008, mid-financial crisis—leading to Lesson 1a: Timing is everything. But rather than get discouraged, the city restructured the tunnel, flipping it around so that the concessionaire finalized the design first, thereby delaying the search for financing until the markets could recover. The toll road bid process was cancelled and the project broken up (more on this later). The light rail project was also restructured to fit with evolving ridership in the city. The airport, the last project to be launched, was the first to reach financial close, so here we simply note that hard currency revenues and an existing asset and revenue stream are convenient advantages when financial markets are lean.  Lesson 1b: Roll with the punches.


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