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Small Island Developing States

Resilient transport investments: a climate imperative for Small Island Developing Countries

Franz Drees-Gross's picture
В предыдущих постах я подчеркивала важность создания равных возможностей для всех девочек и мальчиков Армении - учиться, расти, и выбирать способы, с помощью которых они смогут внести вклад в свою экономику, свое общество и в свою страну. Я верю, что более диверсифицированная и устойчивая экономика с более полным диапазоном возможностей как для мужчин, так и для женщин, может помочь замедлить процесс эмиграции и «утечку мозгов», а также поспособствует достижению Арменией устойчивого роста.

В дополнение к нашим обсуждениям здесь, в Армении, по поводу поощрения участия женщин на рынке труда, мы также говорили о том, почему жизнь и благополучие мужчин находятся в таком неблагоприятном положении, например, в связи с устойчиво высоким уровнем смертности среди мужчин взрослого возраста. Мы задались вопросом: как подобная тенденция влияет на экономику и общество в целом?

Small states in search of big solutions: How the Caribbean Growth Forum is accelerating pro-growth reforms

Steve Utterwulghe's picture



Grenada – Photo by Steve Utterwulghe

Many Caribbean States have long been trapped in a vicious cycle of low growth, high debt and limited fiscal space. The impact of the 2008 financial crisis, as well as recurrent natural disasters, has made the situation even more acute in the region.

To address the structural and policy obstacles to development and growth, a multi-stakeholder dialogue platform on growth in the Caribbean was launched in 2012 by policymakers, the private sector and civil society from 12 states in the region. The Caribbean Growth Forum (CGF) was championed by the states’ prime ministers, and focal points were appointed in the respective Ministries of Finance. The World Bank, acting as the CGF Secretariat, has been behind this initiative from the onset, in collaboration with other regional development banks and various development partners active in the region.
 
Using a conceptual framework of reform identification, tracking and reporting, CFG’s stakeholders have made 495 reform recommendations so far – 40 percent of them actionable in the three pre-identified thematic areas: investment climate, connectivity and logistics, and productivity and skills. The World Bank in 2015 undertook a stocktaking exercise, which identified the CGF’s positive impacts and the areas of improvement.

The benefits of the CGF are unanimously recognized: the generation and dissemination of knowledge to support the reform implementation in the three thematic areas; support for the prioritization of government reforms; the strengthening of stakeholders’ accountability; the creation of social capital by giving a voice to a range of stakeholders; peer-to-peer exchanges and pressure; and the fostering of a culture of dialogue in the policy reform agenda.

Along with Cecile Fruman, Director of the Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice of the World Bank Group, I was honored to participate and speak at the launch of the Second Phase of the CGF in Belize on March 1 and 2. The objective of the event was twofold: to share and discuss the lessons learned so far, and to have the finance ministers of 12 Caribbean countries endorse a Joint Communiqué.

That communiqué, according to Sophie Sirtaine, the World Bank’s Country Director for the Caribbean, “signals the renewed commitments of these Caribbean nations to accelerate growth enhancing reform implementation, while strengthening public accountability through strengthened public-private dialogue (PPD) mechanisms.”

Keep it Simple: 7 Takeaways from the Small Island Developing States Conference

Rachel Kyte's picture
Brazil's state of Ceará has just introduced a new parenting designed to stimulate a stronger early childhood development.
Brazil's state of Ceará has just introduced a new parenting program designed to stimulate stronger early childhood development. (Photo: Julio Pantoja / World Bank)

Quality and innovative education policies emerge usually from a combination of factors such as good teachers, quality school management, and parental engagement, among others. In Brazil, a country with tremendous diversity and regional inequalities, good examples have emerged even when they are least expected. Ceará, a state in the northeast region of Brazil — where more than 500,000 children are living in rural areas and where poverty rates are high — is showing encouraging signs of success from innovative initiatives in education. The figures speak for themselves. Today, more than 70 of the 100 best schools in Brazil are in Ceará. 

Nowhere to Go

Rachel Kyte's picture

(c) World Bank GroupYoung Egyptians have an amazing potential that is not yet being utilized. We have a well-established business sector, but with the establishment and success comes an aversion to trying new things. To innovating. While the business sector has made incredible impact on my country, there are still gaps. Gaps in jobs and gaps in services that would allow our most marginalized citizens to escape poverty. This is where entrepreneurs, especially young ones, can help.

Restoring Ocean Health Can Spur Blue Growth in the Islands

Valerie Hickey's picture


El otro día tuve la oportunidad de participar en la Conferencia Anual de la CAF sobre infraestructura, que se llevó a cabo en Ciudad de México. Allí se presentó un nuevo informe sobre el estado de la infraestructura en América Latina y el Caribe (ALC). La conferencia, que contó con la asistencia de muchos de los responsables de la toma de decisiones y formadores de opinión en la región, se organizó en torno a los hallazgos del informe.

A partir de estas interesantes discusiones, saqué varias conclusiones: (1) existe una convergencia en varios de los temas clave y (2) el Banco Mundial tiene importantes mensajes muy específicos sobre el tema.

Big Challenges, Small States: Island Nations Come Together for Climate Action

Rachel Kyte's picture

(c) Marta Milkowska“Every time I see a problem, I create a social business to solve it,” renowned Nobel Prize laureate Muhammad Yunus said to an overflowing room at the World Bank Group’s Headquarters in Washington, DC this summer. “Set up a social business.”

“The poor are like Bonsai trees,” the founder of Grameen Bank explained, “When you plant the best seed of the tallest tree in a six-inch-deep flower pot, you get a perfect replica of the tallest tree, but it is only inches tall. There is nothing wrong with the seed you planted; only the soil-base you provided was inadequate. Poor people are bonsai people. There is nothing wrong with their seeds. Only society never gave them a base to grow on."

Picture (not) perfect – a look behind the scenes of Small Island Developing States

Denis Jordy's picture
版本: English

What will digital innovation mean for trade and development? Source - Riderofthestorm每当我们思考如何消除极度贫困,多数人都会将其与食物、水、住房等基本需求的提供联系起来。一些人认为还应包括清洁空气乃至基本医疗和初等教育等服务。但互联网接入问题是否该纳入考虑呢?互联网与发展之间在哪些方面具有切合点呢?

以上是向即将发布的《2016年世界发展报告:互联网促发展》的作者们提出的诸多重要问题中的两个问题,也是近期在世界银行集团总部召开的“电子化贸易:优势与壁垒”圆桌讨论会的议题。本次讨论会上,经济学家和发展领域专业人士,包括公共和私营部门代表,坐在一起详细讨论了包括上述问题在内的多个问题。

本次讨论的重点是互联网对贸易尤其是发展中国家网上企业主的意义。从多方面讲,互联网均意味着创新。我们怎样才能确保寻求把自身创意向全世界推介并进入全球市场的个人最高效地开展创新呢?这是关于基础设施的问题吗? 亦或是关于监管的问题吗?

以下为数据揭示的内容。