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Zero docks: what we learnt about dockless bike-sharing during #TTDC2018

Leonardo Canon Rubiano's picture
More than 10,000 water professionals from 160 countries gathered in Brasilia two weeks ago at the 8th World Water Forum to discuss current and future water challenges. The Forum’s Declaration, “An Urgent Call for Decisive Action on Water”, issued by Ministers and Heads of Delegations, encourages transboundary cooperation based on win-win solutions in line with UN Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6. (SDG 6 Target 5  calls on the world community to implement integrated water resources management at all levels, ‘including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate’.)

Transboundary waters—which support the socioeconomic wellbeing of more than 40 percent of the global population, as well as the ecosystems on which they depend—were a regular discussion topic in special sessions and high-level panel events at the Forum. This is not surprising given the complex blend of human, environmental and agricultural water stresses that is putting a number of the world’s 286 transboundary river basins on a trajectory toward high risk of water scarcity, and several toward closure—where water demand exceeds supply seasonally or throughout the year—by 2030. The below map, depicting the relative risk of environmental water stress projected for 2030, illustrates the potentially dire future of the world’s transboundary freshwater basins.
 
Source: Global Environment Facility Transboundary Waters Assessment Program 2015. http://twap-rivers.org/

Strengthening national clinical research capacities is key to epidemic preparedness and saving lives

Marie-Paule Kieny's picture
Lancinet Keita. Photo : Mamadou Bah

J’ai récemment eu la possibilité de me rendre dans le Fouta-Djalon, une région du Nord de la Guinée, aux côtés de l’équipe chargée de mettre en œuvre un projet axé sur le développement de filets sociaux productifs visant à autonomiser économiquement les personnes vulnérables. Il s’agissait de lancer les activités de travaux publics à haute intensité de main-d’œuvre (THIMO) prévues dans le cadre du projet. C’était ma première visite de terrain depuis mes débuts à la Banque mondiale. Ce voyage à travers le pays m’a permis de voir de mes propres yeux l’extrême pauvreté. On en entend parler et on lit beaucoup de choses dessus, mais, là, j’ai eu la chance de rencontrer des personnes qui y sont confrontées tous les jours. Je parle de chance, car cette expérience a été pour moi une leçon d’humilité, elle a renforcé ma détermination et rendu d’autant plus nécessaire le récit du quotidien de ces populations, de leurs luttes permanentes et de leurs accomplissements.

En 2012, la pauvreté touchait plus de la moitié (55 %) des habitants de la Guinée, mais ce pourcentage a probablement augmenté sous l’effet de la crise Ebola et de la stagnation de l’économie en 2014 et 2015. Cette pauvreté se concentre fortement dans les zones rurales, où son incidence reste bien plus élevée (65 % en 2012) que dans les centres urbains (35 %). Le manque d’infrastructures, de perspectives économiques et d’accès à l’éducation fait largement obstacle au développement de ces zones.

Can Asia-Pacific achieve sustainable energy for all?

Sharmila Bellur's picture

2010 World Bank Group / International Monetary Fund Spring Meetings Development Committee Meeting.

At a press conference earlier today, World Bank President announced that the Development Committee approved a capital increase, as well as proposed voting reform for the Bank. In his remarks, Mr. Zoellick talked about how these changes will affect the institution, as well as international development on the whole:

"This extra capital can be deployed to create jobs and protect the most vulnerable through investments in infrastructure, small and medium sized enterprises, and safety nets. The change in voting-power helps us better reflect the realities of a new multi-polar global economy where developing countries are now key global players. In a period when multilateral agreements between developed and developing countries have proved elusive, this accord is all the more significant."

A summary of the changes approved by the Development Committee:

  • An increase of $86.2 billion in capital for the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD).
  • A $200 million increase in the capital of the IFC.
  • A 3.13 percentage point increase in the voting power of Developing and Transition countries (DTCs) at IBRD, bringing them to 47.19 percent.
  • An increase in the voting power of Developing and Transition Countries at IFC to 39.48 percent.
  • An agreement to review IBRD and IFC shareholdings every five years with a commitment to equitable voting power between developed countries and DTCs over time.

Serbia successfully tackles antimicrobial resistance

Fadia Saadah's picture
Lancinet Keita. Photo: Mamadou Bah

On my first project visit since joining the World Bank, I had a chance to accompany the Productive Social Safety Nets project team across the country to the Fouta Djallon region, in the northern part of Guinea, for the launch of their Labor Intensive Public Works (THIMO) activities. This trip allowed me to see firsthand what extreme poverty is. You hear and read about it, but I had the opportunity to meet people who experience it every day. I say opportunity, because going through this further humbled me, gave me more determination, and added purpose to the need to tell their stories—stories of their struggles and their achievements.

Poverty affected about 55% of Guinea’s population in 2012, but this percentage is likely to have increased as a result of the Ebola crisis and economic stagnation in 2014 and 2015. Poverty in Guinea is highly concentrated in the rural areas, where the poverty headcount rate remains far higher (65% in 2012) than in urban centers (35%). The lack of infrastructure, and limited economic opportunities and access to education all create a major development issue for these areas.

The high toll of traffic injuries in Central Asia: unacceptable and preventable

Aliya Karakulova's picture
Le redressement du pays dans le sillage de l’épidémie d’Ebola s’est accompagné d’un net redressement des effectifs scolaires, qui ont renoué avec leur niveau de 2011–12 (Photo courtoisie de Katie Meyler / More Than Me)


En mars 2014, le Libéria faisait part de deux cas suspects de fièvre Ebola dans les comtés de Lofa et de Nimba. Six mois plus tard, l’épidémie touchait 14 des 15 comtés du pays et l’état d’urgence était déclaré. En mai 2015, lorsque l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) déclarait officiellement la fin de l’épidémie au Libéria, plus de 10 000 habitants avaient contracté le virus et l’économie de ce pays en situation d’après-conflit connaissait une forte récession.

Transforming Transportation 2018: To Craft a Digital Future for All, We Need Transport for All

Jose Luis Irigoyen's picture
Legislation is pending in Zimbabwe to make government procurement quicker and more transparent.
Photo: Arne Hoel/The World Bank Group


For some time now, public procurement has accounted for a good 20%–25% of Zimbabwe’s annual budget, which currently stands at about US$4 billion. Guided by a law crafted in 1999, the country’s procurement system is centralized, causing bottlenecks and delays.

Preventable traffic injuries and deaths hold back the development of countries

Patricio V. Marquez's picture
In Brazil, a woman trained through the School of Women Leaders explains to her neighbors what she has learned. Photo: Maria do Carmo Carvalho / Habitat for Humanity

Despite the fact that women represent about half of the global population, produce the majority of global food supply, and perform 60% to 80% of the agricultural work in developing countries, women own less than 20% of land worldwide.

Written laws often fall short of adequately protecting women’s tenure rights; while in some countries, formal national laws explicitly discriminate against women. In post-disaster rehabilitation and reconstruction, women face particular hurdles to secure tenure and shelter. Even in areas with strong protections of equality and non-discrimination, displaced women often struggle to assert their property rights.

On March 8, 2016, on the occasion of International Women’s Day, Habitat for Humanity International launched its first global advocacy campaign, “Solid Ground,” which envisions a world where everyone has access to land for shelter. Promoting gender equality and addressing inequitable or unenforced laws, policies, and customary practices affecting women’s rights to security of tenure and inheritance, has been a primary focus of the campaign.

Now mid-way through the campaign, Solid Ground has grown to include 37 national Habitat for Humanity organizations, 17 partner organizations, an active microsite solidgroundcampaign.org (and in Spanish, SueloUrbano.org), and has provided direct financial assistance to country programs working on gender and land issues. In its first year, over 1.3 million people are projected to have improved access to land for shelter through the Solid Ground campaign with a goal of reaching 10 million people, especially women.

Through a variety of efforts to build capacity, mobilize allies, influence policymakers, and work together with our partners, we are seeing signs of progress being made to achieve successful outcomes in helping facilitate women’s land ownership and empowering women to understand and achieve their rights. A sampling of some strategies, cases, and upcoming plans are highlighted below. 

2017 in Review: Look at the posts you engaged with the most on social media

Zubedah Robinson's picture

2018 is here, and we hope your new year is off to a positive start! Thank you for being a part of the global movement to help end poverty. For every like, share, “heart”, retweet, you name it, thanks for engaging with our content!

Every year brings new highlights, challenges, and priorities, and 2017 was no different. Here is a look at some of the content you engaged with the most on social media in the past year:

Twitter:

No one should be driven into bankruptcy simply because they have to pay for healthcare for themselves or their loved ones. So unsurprisingly, you showed strong  support for #HealthforAll during the Universal Health Coverage Forum in December.

We were also very impressed to see how strongly you feel about preserving our planet. During last month’s One Planet Summit, several of you replied to the news of the World Bank’s announcement on phasing out financing of oil and gas exploration, with positivity. For example @RalienBekkers said: “Great, everyone should follow”:
Do you believe that no country can attain its full potential without the equal participation of both women and men in the country’s economy? Many of you agreed that women shouldn’t be restricted from doing some jobs, just because they are women:
 

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